VS .NET vs VS C++ 6.0

I know that this is kinda off topic. But i was wondering what you veterans think about .NET.

In you opinion, is Visual Studio .NET better or is Visual Studio C++ 6.0 better? Why?

[This message has been edited by Halcyon (edited 11-21-2002).]

i use .net

why? much bether c++ compiler…
and a nice funny ide

I’ll avoid .NET as long as possible, but I’m sure I’ll be forced to switch eventually.

In the mean time, I use Intel’s compiler in VC 6.0 IDE. Their compiler supports all the “extensions” that MS has had time to add as well as most of the C++ standard which MS can’t be bothered with (template functionality mostly).

– Zeno

Also due to the economy, my employer has been delaying to upgrade to .NET.
I guess it is highly dependent on applications. For us, there is simply no big reason to do the upgrade now. If I have to pick one to buy one now, I will choose .NET though.

I’ve also heard that with .net, there can be a lot of problems. Has anyone with .net had any? If so what are they? I compiled all my programs from vs c++ 6.0 in vc .net and it worked just fine.

.NET … new improved compiler, new sucky IDE, links to new large MFC files that aren’t shipped with any OS out there, so you need to ship them with your app.

So I still use MSVC 6.0

I was looking into switching from VC6.0 to .net. I heard all the good things about the advanced optimized compiler. BUT, there is a severly darkside to that. When you compile with .net, it loads all the .net framework data, and such, this seiously kills whatever performance advancements you got out of the compiler to begin with. Plus it links to a BUNCH of crap you dont need by default. I would choose to stick with VC++ atleast untill .net does what it promised to do, which was a write once compile once run on everything (Java style).

My 2c: I really like Visual C++ .net, the compiler not only produces faster code, the compiler itself executes faster. It only starts loading framework stuff when you tell it to compile Managed C++ which doesn’t apply to Win32 Projects. As for MFC, I’ve had some huge problems with that, ie not being able to package the runtime and not getting code to run on other machines… but fortunately I don’t use MFC much.

How in the world do you add a directory to header files in .net? It’s easy in vc++ 6.0…i can’t seem to find it. There is so much stuff in .net too. I mean i’m overwhelmed with it. I only program win32 applications and most of then are just for graphics.

Originally posted by Zeno:
[b]but I’m sure I’ll be forced to switch eventually.

– Zeno[/b]

Why? VC6 going to wear out?

It’s not like MS ever fixes any bugs in any of their products so that can’t be your reason…

64bit perhaps?

I think you should use the .Net

Why ??

1)Integration between VS Languages .

How ??

**You can easily write a com component in any VS

language and use it in any VS other language

without any bugs which were famous in Visual

Studio 6.0.

2)Microsoft as i know is now developing OS

Windows.net” in which all the .NET Application

will be supported .

3)Microsoft is now trying to make the .Net

applications portable applications like “Java”

by coordinating with its partners …

4)Very Fantastic IDE .

5)Many Other Reasons but really the space is

limited to mention here .

Hazem_vb

An OpenGL Game Developer

Originally posted by davepermen:
[b]i use .net

why? much bether c++ compiler…
and a nice funny ide [/b]

Welcome Back

.NET != .NET, dudes

visual studio .net has development tools to develop for the .net platform, namely vb.net and c#.net are made for this only. c++ is supported in 2 ways: managed c++ and the normal c++. managed c++ gets compiled into .net bytecode and fits to the c# and vb classes constructs what ever perfectly, so you can code with what language(s) you want in .net…

the standart c++ is just like before. it compiles down to an x86 executable. it does NOT use .net, it does NOT use huge mfc libraries if you don’t ask for it, it does produce very fast executables (and vc7.1 will be much bether again in that position, 98% c++ iso standard compliant, and inlining from other files, even from libraries… so you can have optimized math libraries for example, simply link em and get full inlined optimized math routines. quite fun ), compiles very fast, has very good and helpful compiler errors (espencially in templates, where they print out all type parameters…)
the ide is new, different, but by NO means sucky. its very configurable, lets you set everything how ever you want, and thus fits perfectly my needs, your needs, and any others needs, too.
vs.net uses huge harddisk space if not installed correctly, else about one giga for c# and c++, wich is acceptable… still big…
vs.net uses quite a bunch of resources…
the debugger is bether, too… (while i don’t need to debug often anyways…)

all in all, its a great product. i would never move back to vc6 except i get forced to. but i’m happy as well that i don’t need to pay that horrend price for it. half because i can get it illegal for free, half because i can get it cheap due students connections, who get everything cheap from m$…

I would like to move to .NET but for now it seems that I’m forced to stick to VC6. The main problem is with the current structure of our engine and the way that source safe now operates on directories. It seems that is impossible to add into a project, directories from another location (on the disk) and make them safe source controlled. The SS will copy the files into the directory of the project, so I will get multiple copies in every project that uses these external files. Plus, there are some annoying UI faults like poorly distributed buttons on frequently used dialogs (like the ok button on check out dialog). In average in the new UI I need to double button clicks to make the same thing as in the VC6 (maybe I’m not used with the new interface). But also it has some other major advantages that eventually will me to move to .net.

I would like to move to .NET but for now it seems that I’m forced to stick to VC6. The main problem is with the current structure of our engine and the way that source safe now operates on directories. It seems that is impossible to add into a project, directories from another location (on the disk) and make them safe source controlled. The SS will copy the files into the directory of the project, so I will get multiple copies in every project that uses these external files. Plus, there are some annoying UI faults like poorly distributed buttons on frequently used dialogs (like the ok button on check out dialog). In average in the new UI I need to double button clicks to make the same thing as in the VC6 (maybe I’m not used with the new interface). But also it has some other major advantages that eventually will me to move to .net.

@Hazem_vb:

>>"…)Very Fantastic IDE…"

if the IDE is so fantastic and great, than i’m wondering why wholetomato, the makers of rea_fantastiv VisualAssist, are providing an additional VS.NET version of their VisualAssist but i thought it is so fantastic ??

visual assist is great…
by the ide i mean the visual part of it, the actual possibilities to configure all the windows how you want, etc (espencially for 2monitor platforms its great )

the text editor with its intellisence is again beaten by visual assist, yeah… (while it is much bether than the vc6 one anyways…)

Originally posted by davepermen:
the ide is new, different, but by NO means sucky. its very configurable, lets you set everything how ever you want, and thus fits perfectly my needs, your needs, and any others needs, too.

However I want? Not sure about that. I gave it a try, used it for several weeks until I decided that it’s annoying interface never really let me be as productive as in VC6.0.
In VC 6.0, you compile, the output with errors and such ends up in the windows at the bottom of the screen. You hit F4 and go to the error and fix it, compile and run. Go back to the code, hit Esc to get rid of that output window and it goes away immediately. Clean and simple.
VC.NET, errors go into a TODO list instead. I mean, wtf, who doesn’t fix his error directly if it doesn’t compile? The output window will remain on screen taking unneccesary screen space. The closest to the way I want it I could configure was to let it autohide when it looses focus. But it doesn’t hide immediately. It kept annoying me that the window would remain on screen for a second or two every time. It doesn’t seam like a big deal at first, but over time it gets increasingly annoying.
Also, it collects all files I have ever opened in that list on the left. Fine for some apps, but doesn’t fit with the way I work. I often just open older files to take a look and then close it. I don’t feel like cleaning that list over and over again.

First after having tried .NET for some time I really understood how great VC 6.0 really is. The only thing I miss is better ANSI compatibility and a slightly better compiler.

I MUCH prefer the .net IDE - I guess those complaining that they are less productive in the new environment are, well, experiencing some kind of cognitive dissonance. I was most comfortable using Turbo C 2.0 - I knew all the hotkeys!

I’m still using version 6. It does everything I need and Im quite comfortable with it and MFC. This compares to me upgrading my OS. I have XP but I prefer to stick with 2k.

Anyone using .NET for what it’s ment for? Planning on moving over to C#?

V-man