devicedriver_position@opengl.org

tiger-ed, can I ask which company you are working for ?

Regards.

Eric

It is an interesting thread.

It’s funny how the things that used to be considered important never get mentioned in modern CS courses. I remember one of the first things I was officially taught (almost 20 years ago now) was two’s complement math. I (being a contractor) worked with a couple of graduates not too long ago who had never even heard of it!

As for a basic programming skills, if you didn’t know assembly forget it. I suspect many people who graduate nowadays wouldn’t know what assembly even looked like, let alone how to program with it. I still go bleary eyed thinking about the XY registers and the accumulator! (remember those?)

I accept that CS in general is very diverse, and that perhaps there is a need for many different skills - but I also think learning the basics should be forced upon everyone … much like learning latin was!

BTW Eric and tiger-ed … where abouts are you in the uk? I’m in Kent.

I just had a programming course at my school, which happened to be c++ (i already knew c/c++ (and even some assembly ) before, but reading the stuff is required for reading on).

Most of the people sat there about 1/3 of a year trying to figure out input using the cin/cout classes. During that 1/3 of a year we didnt even “learn” how a string works, actually we only barly covered functions/variables.

Guess I wont be looking forward to the next year’s courses :stuck_out_tongue: And I especially choose Mathematical/Computer Sciences (“Natur - Matte/Data”)… Oh, well at least the math part is ok.

Originally posted by mcraighead:
[b]To add to my bitter remarks…

The required AI class is laughable; they take this attitude that practically everything done with computers is “AI”, and so you get to learn about search algorithms that belong in an algorithms class, not an AI class.

  • Matt[/b]

I majored in Intelligent Systems' - what you are talking about isclassical’ AI, which essentially all boils down to a search problem (across some database that in actuality must be probably near infinite in size!).

Neural Networks were more interesting though. Neither paradigm is suitable for consciousness and hence, in my opinion, true intelligence.

But thats another story…

Do you guys think it is possible in a computer based degree to provide adequate levels of both computer science and computer engineering?

My university course falls between two stools. We don’t do enough maths, but the systems courses have been rather mediocre (main project was building a voltmeter out of a z80).

Perhaps there is a need to branch computing off into two related courses: computation (maths heavy, plenty of algorithmics, solid treatment of Godel and the like) and computer engineering (more electronics and hardware work).

As it is at present, graduates from here can not necessarily either read Knuth or write an operating system. (as a result of the course alone; people here are pretty bright in general though).

Henry

Originally posted by HenryR:
[b]

As it is at present, graduates from here can not necessarily either read Knuth or write an operating system. (as a result of the course alone; people here are pretty bright in general though).

Henry[/b]

Well, I think if you asked the academics, they will tell you their goal is to provide a broad-based introduction to any given area for a student. In most cases, specific skills are taught either by the company you work for after or by post-graduate study (or by self-teaching of course).

In general most unis do this well. You will learn enough of the basics to be able to find further information you might need for any given task.

Well, I think if you asked the academics, they will tell you their goal is to provide a broad-based introduction to any given area for a student. In most cases, specific skills are taught either by the company you work for after or by post-graduate study (or by self-teaching of course).

In general most unis do this well. You will learn enough of the basics to be able to find further information you might need for any given task.

Well, yeah, but my point was that perhaps computer science as it stands now has too broad a base. I don’t mean to suggest getting more specific in the teaching (until the last year perhaps), but giving yourself room to get advanced, which is obviously distinct. I don’t want to be taught how write device drivers for Linux. I do want to be taught how to write device drivers (if I were a computer engineering kind of guy).

Different places strike different compromises, especially with regards to how much you are expected to pick up for yourself. A good example is the question of language teaching. Some universities have a C++ / Java / your OOP language here hand-holding course, where you are taught a specific language thoroughly, where other places assume that you are bright enough, given a rough understanding of procedural techniques and a textbook, to pick up all the languages you need.

I could go on for ages. But I won’t

Henry

True enough. When I was at University, writing a DD would have been a good dissertation project. Of course we learn about devices and how they integrate with the OS at a higher level but most students would lack the lower level skills to be able to understand\write one themselves. Of course, you being the brightest student in the class could manage it!